A piece of amber found a flower previously unknown to science

A piece of amber found a flower previously unknown to science

Photo: OSU

Found in flower resin about 100 million years ago at the supercontinent of Gondwana

Experts say that amber can store organic objects for tens or hundreds of millions of years.

In Myanmar, where Burmese amber is mined, a flower previously unknown to scientists has been found in a piece of fossil resin. The discovery was attributed to the angiosperms of the Cretaceous period, the genus Velvillocollus, and the species – Pleristaminis. It was reported by the Botanical Journal BRIT.

“The flower was found in resin at the supercontinent of Gondwana about 100 million years ago. It was probably part of the inflorescence of different sexes.

According to scientists, the flower is only two millimeters in diameter and is the size of a cup of eggs, with six perianth leaves.

“The discovery of the small flower may help to learn more about ancient geological processes,” experts say.

The fact that scientists divide the Gondwana date differently resulted in the creation of a plate in the place where Myanmar is now located. The difference is severe: from 200 million to 500 million years ago.

Biologists believe that angiosperms started spreading about 100 million years ago. In particular, the flower found in amber, probably grows directly in or is very close to the Gondwana forest, where the plate departed.

“This means that the split may occur much later than previously thought,” scientists say.

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