“WHO funding must be on a safe and stable long-term basis”

Imaginez that the authorities ask you to build a new tertiary care hospital [fortement spécialisés], But let them give you only 20% of the budget, which is a little more than the cost of building the foundation. You are informed that you will have to get the remaining 80% in consultation with doctors set up in a private practice in the wing of the more or less finished building.

However, the authorities do not allow you to organize your services as you wish; Again they force you to figure out what features you can come up with and how to use the recipes and ultimately you have a lot of money for walls and plumbing, but you don’t have access to roofing, electricity or medical supplies and equipment. There is no one for.

The organization relies on the goodwill of some of its member states – which voluntarily provide additional funding – and other foundations and organizations.

The World Health Organization (WHO) budget looks like this: in fact, less than 20% of the budget comes from the original “contributions” of the 194 countries that are members of the WHO and provide it. WHO must seek funding to finance the rest of its budget.

Currently, the organization relies on the goodwill of some of its member states – which voluntarily provide additional funding – and other foundations and organizations. However, half of these contributions, which represent 80% of the budget, come with such conditions that WHO can buy all the bricks it needs, but cannot get electricity.

See also  Egypt's 'Lost City of Gold' shows the life of ancient pharaohs

Do we want to fund an organization responsible for helping achieve health for all and build a better prepared, more protective and more responsive world, better able to face the next pandemic, or here Even so many other health challenges? certainly not. And yet, this is the situation we are currently facing.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the precarious state and stability of WHO funding.

Also read Tribune: Articles reserved for our customers “Rethinking the health system as democratically as possible to meet the crises of the 21st century”

While some disease-specific areas of work generate interest and attract funding, others, such as preparatory work, are needed to better prepare the world for the next large-scale pandemic outbreak caused by a disease. . Recommendations for establishing pathogens, or best practices that can help the world reduce the burden of disease on populations, may be seen by WHO member states as priorities, but their funding is not so much.

You have 56.29% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Hanley Mallin

Internet geek. Wannabe bacon enthusiast. Web trailblazer. Music maven. Entrepreneur. Pop culture fan.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *