Trump thanks British SAS hero who saved American lives in Nairobi terror attack

President Trump has personally thanked a British SAS hero who shot and killed two terrorists during the Nairobi terrorist attacks in 2019 and rescued hostages, including Americans.

The elite soldier, identified as Chris Craighead, revealed that he met with the president by posting a picture of the senior meeting on Instagram on Monday last year.

Craighead said the meeting was unplanned, and was held after Trump “heard that … I was in town” and “took the time to personally thank me for saving the lives of Americans.”

After leaving the Special Forces, he was honored that his colleagues had ‘pushed him away’ and that he was ‘jealous’ of the attention he was paying attention to, when the doctrine of the SAS forced them to fight in the shadows.

The protagonist of a British Special Air Service who helped save Americans during a jihadist attack on a Kenyan hotel in 2019 shared a picture of himself with President Donald Trump on Instagram on Monday. The soldier’s pseudonym on the Instagram account is Christian Craighead

Craighead reveals some details about his meeting with Trump in the Instagram caption (above)

In an Instagram caption (above), Craighead reveals some details about his meeting with Trump.

Craighead was stationed in January 2011 to train the country’s troops when armed jihadists from the al-Shabab terrorist group seized the Dusit D2 luxury hotel complex in India.

The photo shows Trump shaking Craighead’s hand, snatching up the army’s fianc শe, Shila Craighead, who is acting as the White House photographer for the president’s chief official.

In all of Craighead’s photos, the bottom half of his face is blurred to protect his identity, as well as other possible identification items in the room.

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Craighead wrote, ‘Last year I had the opportunity to meet with the 45th President of the United States, Donald J. Trump.

‘I’ll leave it to you: the meeting was unplanned and he had nothing to gain from it. When he heard from key people in the administration that I was in town, he took the time to thank me personally for saving the lives of Americans. ‘

Craighead was helping to train the country’s security forces in Kenya when jihadist militants from the al-Shabab terrorist group launched an attack on the DusitD2 hotel complex in the capital, Nairobi, on January 15, 2014.

Despite off-duty at the time and shopping outside, Craighead had his gear in his car, so he sped off to the complex for help.

Craighead is involved with Shayla Craighead (pictured), who is the White House photographer for the president's chief official.

Craighead is involved with Shayla Craighead (pictured), who is the White House photographer for the president’s chief official.

Upon arrival, he ‘organized the whole operation’ – according to SAS veteran Chris Ryan – with instructions to the police and army.

The two militants were then shot dead and taken hostage by a one-man raid on the Krieghead Hotel complex.

Footage of Craighead’s solo mission was seen around the world and he was awarded the UK’s second highest military award, the Prosperous Gallantry Cross (CGC).

But it also caused a rift between Craighead and the rest of his SAS unit, who are accustomed to working away from the spotlight, their heroic deeds mostly obsolete.

It was revealed in September of that year that Craighead had left the unit out of Hereford base, ‘disgusted’ during his treatment, holding the hands of ‘Here jealous’ colleagues.

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He then launched his Instagram page with pictures of his time on SAS during the campaign, along with notes on his equipment, his training and inspirational quotes.

The page caused panic among UK defense officials, who feared legal action would be taken to protect Craighead from disclosing his identity or sensitive information.

Under strict rules, Special Forces soldiers must not discuss their public missions in public or ‘cash in’ on their activities.

The rules were introduced after a flurry of books by former Army officers Chris Ryan and Andy McNab, which dramatically raised the public profile of the SAS and raised concerns about the leaking of sensitive information to Special Forces that could compromise future operations.

Footage of the single mission to end the siege of the Nairobi Hotel in Craighead was seen around the world and he was awarded the Conspiracy Gallantry Cross, the UK's second highest military award.

Footage of the single mission to end the siege of the Nairobi Hotel in Craighead was seen around the world and he was awarded the Conspiracy Gallantry Cross, the UK’s second highest military award.

Craighead uses Instagram to promote optimal equipment and weapons for SAS soldiers – although it is unclear whether he is being paid for approval.

A source said: ‘We are concerned about his activities online and we want to avoid any legal disputes with him.

‘He’s weak, he recently left the regiment where he felt underestimated by colleagues.’

Craighead blurred his face in all of his Instagram photos to protect his true identity

Craighead blurred his face in all of his Instagram photos to protect his true identity

Senior officials have said they would like to speak to him on an urgent basis in order to disclose any sensitive information about his identity or the Special Forces operation.

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Top brochures were also concerned about a book about the man’s friendship with Rhine and the apparent planning of a film, which began his literary and film career after the Africa Mission and Bravo to Zero Mission in the 1991 Gulf War in Iraq.

But friends of the disgruntled elders said the blame fell on SAS officers and soldiers who denied him credit for his work. One said: ‘There was a very fresh response inside the SIS camp to get CGC to him.

At the time, other blocs had been fighting Islamic State in Iraq and Syria for months without official recognition.

‘No one outside the regiment will ever learn what they did. So they turned to him, which was really harsh.

‘He deserves several pats on the back and it’s a shame that his SAS career ended like this’

Craighead (right) was seen carrying an injured man to safety during the hotel attack

Craighead (right) was seen carrying an injured man to safety during the hotel attack

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