The government has rejected a Madrid court order to lock down the Spanish capital

Last Thursday, people lined up for a quick antigen test for COID-19, south of Vallicas in Madrid, Spain - a day before government sanctions on the movement went into effect.

A Madrid court last week overturned a strict new lockdown law imposed by the government on the Spanish capital for spreading the carnivirus.

The health ministry on Friday banned 47 million people in the city from leaving their home areas without doing business.

However, the head of the regional government, Isabel Diaz Ioso, opposed the order, saying it would hurt the region’s economy and that the ministry had no authority to impose such sanctions.

Madrid’s regional court upheld the ruling, calling the ban a “fundamental right” without a legal order to uphold the “intervention of citizens by government authorities”.

People lined up for a quick antigen test for COID-19 in the southern suburbs of Vallicas in Madrid, Spain, last Thursday – a day before government sanctions on the movement went into effect.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez (left) speaks during a bilateral press conference with Madrid Regional President Isabel Diaz Ioso (right) after a meeting in Madrid last month.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez (left) speaks during a bilateral press conference with Madrid Regional President Isabel Diaz Ioso (right) after a meeting in Madrid last month.

R-Rate: R-Rate in Madrid is below 0.91 and below 1.00 - this means that infections are not increasing.

R-Rate: R-Rate in Madrid is below 0.91 and below 1.00 – this means that infections are not increasing.

Infections: A graph showing the first and second wave of outbreaks in Madrid - it should be noted that higher cases are not associated with more deaths as testing capacity is now higher

Infections: A graph showing the first and second wave of outbreaks in Madrid – it should be noted that higher cases are not associated with more deaths as testing capacity is now higher

The ruling means the police cannot fine people for leaving the municipality without a reason.

However, there is growing confusion over whether Madrid residents will be able to travel to other parts of Spain to celebrate the national holiday this weekend.

Other restrictions that are not affected by this ruling include six-person hat assembly, bars, shops and capacity and opening time limits.

Madrid is at the center of a political tussle between Spain’s national and regional authorities that has upset many people who are adopting a more biased strategy than actual action against the epidemic.

The two sides met later on Thursday.

The region has 591 coronavirus infections per 14,000 days per 100,000 inhabitants, more than double Spain’s national average and a five-time European average of 113 in the week ending September 2.

However, Madrid’s R-rate – this is the rate of infection – remains below the critical figure of 1.00 after rising to more than 1.50 in July and stands at 0.99 today.

READ  Travel latest news: British await shake-up of secession rules after months of holiday chaos

Figures above 1.00 mean that the infection is multiplying.

The initial response from the government – which could appeal the ruling – was that Health Minister Salvador Ila said he had not yet had time to study it.

‘We will make legal decisions that best protect health. We are sure that the community of Madrid will agree with this approach. We don’t care about anything other than the health of the citizens, ‘he said without mentioning anything else in the parliamentary committee.

Madrid Regional President Isabel Diaz Ioso during the plenary session of the Madrid Regional Assembly on Thursday

Spanish Health Minister Salvador Ila sits before the deputies of Congress appear before the Health Commission on Thursday.

Madrid Regional President Isabel Diaz Ayuso and Spanish Health Minister Salvador Ila (right) in front of the Health Commission at a rally in Madrid on Thursday (left)

Police are controlling motorists at a checkpoint in Madrid on Monday after the health ministry imposed its new measures on Friday

Police are controlling motorists at a checkpoint in Madrid on Monday after the health ministry imposed its new measures on Friday

The ministers approved the new rules in an effort to reduce the rate of infection in Madrid and became the first European capital to return to full lockdown.

Restaurant owner Sonny van den Holstein said last week that he was frustrated by the political turmoil and the crushing embarrassment for his business.

‘It’s been eight months without our masks and nightclubs and parties, and there’s still contagion. So what kind of impact will these restrictions have? ‘

‘People are confused, they hesitate to go out … they are scared,’ he said.

Famous for late night driving and the influx of lively tourists in general, Madrid bars and restaurants were ordered to close two hours earlier than the previous 1am curfew, while restaurants, gyms and shops were said to be halved in capacity.

The number of coronavirus cases continues to rise in most parts of Europe – France reported the most ODIs of all time on Wednesday, with intense spies recorded in Italy and Germany.

These measures have already increased a narrowness in the poorest areas of the city where there is a high infection rate.

Conservative regional leader Ayuso tweeted his anger at the prime minister at the time, writing: ‘From tomorrow no one will be able to go from Berlin to Madrid but from Parla (a peripheral city south of Madrid). Thanks for the chaos, Pedro Sanchez. ‘

READ  Coronavirus latest: Death toll in California rises to 14,000 after largest daily jump

In his appeal, Parla argued that these measures did not adequately combat the epidemic and that the economy would spend 50 million euros (63 million) per week on the local economy.

Prime Minister Sanchez said the only goal was to save lives and protect health. At a conference in Brussels, he said, “All decisions are made on the basis of the citations of scientists.” ‘

According to WHO data released last week, the city had 850 cases per 100,000 people, one of the highest infection rates in Europe.

According to the World Health Organization, the Madrid region had 741 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in two weeks, making it the second densest Covid-19 cluster in Europe after Andorra.

But across the country, Spain seems to be moving in the right direction.

It’s hard to analyze because of the country’s presentation of daily infection data, but the seven-day rolling average shows that the number of infections dropped from more than 11,000 a day two weeks ago, to about 1,500 a day now.

Mallorca and Ibiza cornoviruses are ready for the third wave war

Writes Rita Sobot in Spain for MailOnline

The holiday islands of Mallorca and Ibiza are ready for a third wave of coronavirus war, health officials have acknowledged.

Public health chiefs say they are not sure if it will strike in the next few weeks or during Christmas but they are sure it is coming.

This is the first time a Spanish territory has spoken publicly about a third wave, but the Balearic government says it has already made urgent plans to deal with it.

The possibility of further coronavirus outbreaks, however, will deter any tourism revival plan this year. It’s also a blow to the Baliarians, where new cases of Covid-19 are finally slowing down under the second wave.

The shock came during a news conference in Mallorca, Ibiza, Menorca and Formentera to discuss the evolution of the epidemic.

The director general of public health, Maria Antonia Font, said they had turned the tide of the second wave and the cases had come down but admitted: ‘Probably the third. We don’t know when it will come but we don’t want to be surprised that we are working in all situations. We waited for the second one to arrive and it arrived earlier. ‘

READ  China set to block UK’s offer of citizenship to Hong Kong residents

He said they were working on a scenario where the third wave could be ‘tomorrow’ and said: ‘We are analyzing what margins there are to improve on the first and second waves.’

Autonomous coronavirus management committee spokesman said. Javier Aranz says the concern for the way forward is mobility and social and family gatherings that will escalate the cases.

But about the third wave, he said: ‘If there is one, until there is a transition and we continue to behave well, it will have less impact, less events and shorter duration.’

One step that can help the third wave is the use of antigen tests that give results within 20 minutes.

According to the island journal Periodico de Ibiza, they can be used in schools, residences or ports and airports if research by the health department proves their effectiveness in asymptomatic cases.

‘We have a variety of diagnostic tools to launch at the right time,’ said the director of public health.

In anticipation of Third Wave and Saturated Health Centers, several Express COVID test centers have already been launched, two of which are for school-children.

The Balearic government says the second wave is “continuing unabated” and that the incidence in the archipelago is 142 per 100,000 inhabitants in the last 14 days, 130 in Mallorca. There have been 65 incidents on the island in the last seven days.

The positive rate for PCR test in the last two weeks is 3..622 percent. International sanitary recommendations are that the incidence is below 60 and the positive rate is below five percent.

“We still have a few weeks left,” Dr. Orange said.

317 people have died in Baliarix since the epidemic began.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Hanley Mallin

Internet geek. Wannabe bacon enthusiast. Web trailblazer. Music maven. Entrepreneur. Pop culture fan.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *