Queen guitarists Brian May and Patrick Mitchell explain how they get stereo images of asteroids

You can be the guitarist of a pop-rock group Queen And … a recognized scientist. This is the case of Brian May specializing in producing stereo images of asteroids. This work, of genuine scientific and not only artistic interest, he does in close collaboration with his friend Patrick Michel, CNRS research director at the Cte ​​d’Azur Observatory, principal investigator and co-investigator of several international missions. Know his work in this video.

Brian May, Co-Founder ofasteroid day and guitarist of the group Queen, and Patrick Mitchell, CNRS research director at the Cte ​​d’Azur Observatory, principal investigator and co-investigator of several international missions, explain their work creating stereo pairs of asteroid images and modeling films. digital training and development of asteroids, allowing them to be viewed in 3 dimensions.

These stereo pairs of images have real scientific value

In addition to the spectacular spectacle, thanks to Brian May’s artistry, these stereo pairs of images have real scientific value. Brian May is also the co-author of several scientific publications of Patrick Mitchell which provide his images and stereo films of his simulations.

a general enthusiasm

In this video, which was made by both the friends together on the occasion ofasteroid day, they describe their activity on the subject and the enthusiasm they have is the same. In particular, Brian fully explains the concept and difficulties of creating stereo pairs that allow viewing in 3D from two 2D images! As Patrick Mitchell also points out, there is a lot of interest in this, not just to help with the conduct of investigations (for example to find) landing site) but also for science, which led to the two collaborators signing several publications.

See also  Scientists use groundbreaking treatment to 'reverse aging'

“It’s very inspiring, especially for young people who can see a rock star talking about science, get excited about it and produce images of great scientific value, so I think it’s a great Spreading To convey the message that “when we do science, we have fun” (figuratively…)”, Patrick Mitchell specifies.

Interested in what you just read?

You May Also Like

About the Author: Abbott Hopkins

Analyst. Amateur problem solver. Wannabe internet expert. Coffee geek. Tv guru. Award-winning communicator. Food nerd.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *