Leonid Meteor Shower with 15 shooting stars per hour to illuminate the night sky next week

The Leonid meteor shower is visible with 15 shooting stars per hour around the world to illuminate the night sky next week

  • The Leonid meteor shower is set to peak from 16 November to 17 November
  • It’s an annual event, but this year will be more visible than last year
  • The moon can only be five percent brighter at peak night
  • Skygazers should have 10 to 15 meteors flying in the sky every hour
  • NASA says the best viewing time for a meteor shower will be around 3 a.m. ET

The Leonid meteor shower is set for an exhibition coming out of this world next week, with a meteorite extending across the sky every five minutes during its peak.

The event peaked overnight from November 16 to November 17 and was reported to carry several intense meteors – some events saw 50,000 meteors per hour.

Although the fountain is annual, this year’s crescent moon will be more visible than the last because it is only five percent brighter.

NASA says the best time for skyscrapers to have their eyes on the cosmic show is in the morning in both the northern and southern hemispheres.

The Leonid meteor shower is set for an exhibition coming out of this world next week, with a meteorite extending across the sky every five minutes during its peak. Pictured at the 1998 event above Joshua Tree National Park

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‘Leonids, which peaks in mid-November each year, is considered a large waterfall, although meteor rates are as low as about 15 meteors per hour, NASA said in a statement.

“Leonids can be bright meteors and even colorful.”

Meteorites travel at a speed of about 44 miles per second and are considered to be the ‘fastest thing’ in space.

The event occurs every November as the comet crosses Earth’s orbit with Temple-Total, Space.com reports.

The event peaked overnight from November 16 to November 17 and is known to carry several intense meteorites - some events saw 50,000 meteorites per hour (Figure 1998 showers).

The event peaked overnight from November 16 to November 17 and is known to carry several intense meteor storms – some events saw 50,000 meteors per hour (Figure 1998 showers).

When our planet passes through the orbit of a comet, it passes through debris rocks that allow meteors to collide with our atmosphere.

The first recorded leonids were spotted in 1833, leading to the discovery of the comet Temple-Total in 1865 – all of which proved that the meteorite in the annual fountain originated from the comet.

NASA says the best way to watch the show is to find a place far away from the streetlights, wear warmer clothes and keep your feet flat to the east.

Although the fountain is annual, this year's crescent moon will be more visible than the last because it is only five percent brighter.  NASA says the best time for skyscrapers to feed their eyes on the cosmic display is around 3 a.m. in both the northern and southern hemispheres.  Photo showers throughout Tuscan, Arizona in 2001

Although the fountain is annual, this year’s crescent moon will be more visible than the last because it is only five percent brighter. NASA says the best time for skyscrapers to feed their eyes on the cosmic display is around 3 a.m. in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Photo showers across Tuscan, Arizona in 2001

The American space agency shared, “Get yourself on your feet to the east, stay flat behind you and look up at the sky as much as you can, look up.”

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In less than 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adjust and you will begin to see meteors. Be patient – the show will run until dawn, so you have plenty of time to catch a glimpse. “

The Leonid meteor shower got its name from its brilliance, where Leo is seen emanating from a meteorite in the constellation.

Every 33 years, the Leonid meteor shower appears as a meteor storm with more than 1000 shooting stars in one hour.

In 2034, researchers predicted that observers would have the opportunity to witness 2,000 meteors per hour in a ‘Leonid storm’.

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