How to see Mars illuminated during the opposition on Tuesday night

Watch how to see Mars in the night sky in October

Mars will be bright and beautiful in the night sky of October 2020.

NASA

Forget it Halloween. The glory of Mars in October 2020 is that the illuminated planet shows a show in the night sky. We got closer to Earth on Mars on Oct. Oct. and now we’ll pump on Oct. 13, when it will be in opposition.

Spotting Mars

Mars has a reputation as a “red” planet, but its spectrum in the night sky is a bit more colorful towards Halloween. It will appear to the naked eye as a bright orange-red dot, like small spots of shiny rust.

In the dark you find it The distinctive color of Mars cl It looks at the eastern sky to increase at night. This is a great time to visit the planet, partly because it is so easy to spot. It should be visible for most of the night. As NASA says, “Just go out and look and you should be able to see your Mars depending on your local weather and illumination conditions.”

See us List of stargazing applications If you want some extra help in determining the position of the planet

Opposition: 13 October

When Mars and the Sun merge with Earth in the middle, the Red Planet is known to oppose it. This is the perfect time to track the movement of Mars across the sky. It will rise to the east as the sun goes down, go to the other side of the sky, and then sink to the west as the sun rises.

NASA described the protests as “effectively a ‘full’ Mars.” While enjoying the protests on Tuesday, October 13. You have to wait more than two years for this to happen again.

The Virtual Telescope project, which brings us live feeds of space programs, will air an anti-Mars vision starting at 1pm on Tuesday. 13 October. This is a perfect way to enjoy the action without worrying about the weather. For people in the United States, this gives you a preview of what to look for after Sunday.

The project hopes to be “the best monitoring situation since July 2018”

“Explains the rastrack model of the planet’s orbit. Earth and Mars are like a track race. Earth is inward, Mars is outward,” NASA said in its WhatsApp blog for October. “Every 26 months, the Earth’s fast-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving, slow-moving Slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly slowly

Tuesday is not the only October show-off in the sky. You can do this too In anticipation of a rare Halloween blue moon It’s not bizarre when our lunar neighbor is full on October 31st; It’s Bu Tiful.

October 6 Rewind of intimate approach

Tuesday,. October marks the closest location to Earth on Mars, but this whole month is still a good time to catch a telescope and get a better look. Give a wave NASA’s perseverance rover This car is on its way to the planet in February 2021 while you are doing it.

On Tuesday, October, NASA shared the artist’s point of view of the closest approach to October, compared to the last time it was disguised in July 2018. The apparent shapes look very similar. This year, the minimum distance to Mars was 38.6 million miles (62 million kilometers), which is about 3 million miles away from 2018.

This artist’s vision shows the apparent size of Mars as it approaches 2018 and 2020.

NASA

The approach may be over, but the planet is still bright at night, so get out and tune in to the live feed of the Virtual Telescope project from the comfort of your computer.

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About the Author: Abbott Hopkins

Analyst. Amateur problem solver. Wannabe internet expert. Coffee geek. Tv guru. Award-winning communicator. Food nerd.

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