“He didn’t deserve to die over twenty dollars”

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Protesters throw slave merchant Edward Colston statue at the port of Bristol during the Black Lives Matter protest rally in Bristol, England, on 7 June. Ben Birchall / PA / AP

Overturned 17th century slave trader Edward Colston statue to be placed in museum thrown into the river In Bristol, England by protesters on Sunday.

On Wednesday, the Bristol City Council announced on Twitter: “The statue of Edward Colston will be taken from the harbor and displayed in one of our museums with Black Lives Matter banners. A decision on how to use the pedestal will be decided democratically through consultation. ”

The council said on its website that it received many ideas on what to do on the remaining plinth, including another important Bristol human statue or revolving art projects.

On the council’s website, Colston’s statue will be on display at the museum alongside Black Lives Matter banners from the recent protest.

Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees announced that a new commission will be set up to study the city’s “real history”.

“The events of the past few days really stressed that as a city, we all have very different understandings about our past. The only way we can work together on our future is to learn the truth of our beginnings, embrace the truth, and share these stories with others. That’s why this commission is so important. ”

He said that so far the education of Bristol’s history was “often flawed”.

Some information: Protesters tied up the bronze sculpture of Edward Colston on Sunday before knocking it over to the cheers of the crowd around him. The demonstrators then rolled the statue to the nearby port and threw it into the Avon River.

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Since the incident, which was applauded by some and died by others as the “mafia rule”, there has been much debate about what to do with the statue.

The Colston statue has been standing in downtown Bristol since 1895, but has become increasingly controversial with petitions demanding removal.

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