Guar. high school students introduce school children to science

out in brokeliende

Posted on 12 October 2021

For 30 years, Fte de la Science has pursued a single objective: to bring science and citizens closer together. More generally, this early October is the meeting point for lovers of knowledge in all fields. At the Lycée Brocéliande de Guer, science is everywhere. In an ecological station for the science village of Rennes, the visit of researcher Virginie Durrier at the Athos laboratory in Rennes, reproduction of drops as part of an experiment conducted in parallel with Thomas Pesquet, scientific puzzles in front of teachers … on the subject Animations abound at Brokeliande High School at the moment.

Two years earlier, an experiment was conducted involving two high school teachers, Anne Hartoux (Earth Science and Life) and Anne-Sophie Candela (Physics-Chemistry) and the Brokelliand School, headed by Marie-Helen Harey. The school children were welcomed by the high school students to follow their lessons. The health crisis put this experience on the backburner. But this year two high school teachers offered to repeat the experience to the head of the primary school. And this Monday afternoon, the second and last students came to welcome the schoolchildren, who were divided into two groups, one in physics and chemistry, the other in SVT. The originality of this action is that high school students become teachers. It is up to them to explain the course and meaning of an experiment to school children. Terminals explain, for example, the operation of a microscope and the preparation of an observation slide. And practice follows theory. School children take one of their hairs which they see with the naked eye and then magnified with the objective of a microscope. It’s the same for salt crystals, an onion, pieces of elodea, and paper. Above, in the physics-chemistry room, we look at the light spectrum.

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“This is undoubtedly my best course of the year…” admits Anne Hartoux, who praises the benefits of this shared work. “It empowers students who change the situation. They must explain, explain, disseminate their knowledge and they do it with great rigor and efficiency. In front of them, school children are very receptive and all this really gives extraordinary results,” he enthuses.

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