GPs in England will take care of the supply of covid vaccine, according to world news

GP services will be cut well in 2021 so that family physicians can vaccinate millions of people against coronavirus in new seven-day-a-week clinics, NHS England said.

Health leaders have warned that surgeons will not be able to provide their full services to patients from next month, as doctors and nurses at more than 1,200 mass immunization centers across England, including sports halls, conference centers and openings, will be immersed to conduct jobs as airspace.

A total of 532 new deaths were reported in the 28 days of Britain’s positive Covid-19 test on Tuesday, the next highest daily number for girls. Some 20,412 people tested positive for Covid-19, down slightly from the previous day.


Although covid vaccines have been seen as important for a gradual return to normal, there are growing concerns about the pressure on the already expanding NHS, and the first wave of epidemics was postponed after too much care for patients.

The first possible Covid-19 vaccine on Monday yielded promising interim results, with worldwide tests showing 90% efficacy. Britain has purchased 40 million doses of the Pfizer / Bioentech vaccine, can provide 20 million people with adequate doses of the two-dose vaccine and hopes to begin introducing them to the elderly and healthcare and caring domestic workers in a few weeks.

The NHS England has agreed with the British Medical Association that family doctors will play a key role in the vaccination campaign, an unprecedented scale and complexity in the NHS’s 733-year history, described by Health Secretary Matt Hancock as “a huge logical operation”.

In a letter to GP leaders confirming the deal, NHS chiefs acknowledged that GP surgeries could not proceed as normal when their doctors were engaged in vaccination efforts. “We also know that the Covid-19 vaccination program may require practice to prioritize clinical activity over the extra workload,” wrote NKHS England’s primary supervising director.

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GPs will open at least 1,260 mass vaccination centers across England. Each time their or practice nurses will pay each recipient two doses each time, at intervals of a few weeks, whichever vaccine is approved by European and British drug regulators – Pfizer / Bionetech candidates. Each site will have a dose of at least 975 people

On Tuesday, Hancock announced that যত 150 million would be provided to help primary care services recruit more GPs and to increase the support provided to patients with the disease by patients with “long covid”. It is unknown at this time what he will do after leaving the post.

However, medical leaders have expressed concern that the NHS does not have adequate staff or infrastructure, such as freezers and lorries to store vaccines, and “desperate scrambles” for privately viewed kits in the spring.

The head of GPS Royal College told the Guardian that the widespread shortage of family doctors and the existing strain on surgery meant that hospital doctors also needed help.

Under the new law announced by the government, a wide range of healthcare workers, including midwives, paramedics, physiotherapists and pharmacists, will be allowed to be vaccinated against the flu and possibly Covid-19.

“Before the epidemic still existed, work pressures and resource pressures faced common practice and needed to be addressed. The GP and our teams cannot provide this program alone, ”said Professor Martin Marshall, chairman of the college.

“We need support from other healthcare professionals in our community, and possibly secondary [hospital] Caring colleagues, such as external service providers. “

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He added that there was a need for clarity on what we should stop doing to build the capacity of GVs to provide covid vaccination programs.

Dr. Nick Scriven, past president of the Society of Acute Medicine, which represents hospital physicians, said NHS officials and ministers must overcome “multiple challenges” to ensure the vaccine rollout is successful.

“It simply came to our notice then. Two jobs, three weeks apart, people can recover somewhere for 15 minutes – much more complicated than managing a winter flu jab.

“This is an unprecedented initiative for the NHS and the country. The NHS does not have the kits and logistics to do this today. But it will be able to do it with enough notice. Free logistics can mean that people take longer to roll out the vaccine than they imagined and expected. Perhaps that’s why Boris Johnson on Monday urged people not to move too far. “

Ruth Rankine, director of the NHS Confederation’s primary care network, said access to GP care was not inevitable for patients because of the vaccination initiative. “Providing a vaccination program on this scale from scratch means business is not possible as usual, so public expectations need to be managed at the national level.”

However, a senior Whitehall official said there should be no problem in getting to where the vaccine is needed because NHS England has spent months arranging cold storage transport vehicles. “These things are definitely happening,” the source said.

Richard Wilding, a professor of supply chain strategy at Cranfield University, said the NHS would need to acquire significant amounts of dry ice to store and transport the vaccine, as well as contain adequate low-temperature specialist containers. He added that those who operate these will need to be provided with plenty of freezers, syringes, needles and PPE.

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The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) placed NHS England in charge of overseeing the supply of this vaccine, which will be extended to the rest of the population next year. This means that, unlike sourcing PPEs and ventilators in the event of an epidemic, the NHS England is responsible for ensuring adequate resources for the drive. This is due to release plans for its deployment next week.

A DHSC spokesperson said: “The NHS has extensive experience in providing a comprehensive vaccination program and our healthcare system has adopted a number of plans to ensure that any Covid-19 vaccine is ready.

“This includes logistics efficiency, transportation, PPE and the deployment of an expanded workforce to ensure that they meet safety and efficacy standards and ensure that we can deploy vaccines quickly once approved by the drug regulator.”

On Wednesday, the European Commission will formally approve EU member states to purchase 300m doses of the Pfizer / Bioentech vaccine.

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