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Iraqis Their Kovid continues to dig up the dead to reconsider their rightful place. AFP Report and a warning, this is a upsetting story.

Mohammed al-Bahadali dug empty-handed in the sands of Iraq’s hot desert to reach his father’s body.

“Now he can finally stay in the old cemetery with our people, our family,” said Bahadali, 49, who wrapped his body in a shroud and shook the body.

After easing restrictions on burying those who died in the coronavirus, Iraqis are calling for the victims to be resurrected in their proper place in the family cemetery.

For months, the family was prevented from returning to the cemetery, fearing the bodies could still spread the virus.

Instead, authorities set up a “coronavirus cemetery” on a desert plot outside the shrine town of Najaf, where volunteers in protective gear carefully placed the buried victims five meters (1 foot) away.

Only one relative was allowed to attend the quick burial, which often took place at midnight.

Victims of all religious communities – both Shia and Sunni Muslims and Christians – were buried there.

An Iraqi family mourns the coffin of a relative as they return to the huge Wadi al-Salam cemetery in the Shiite holy city of Najaf.

An Iraqi family mourns the coffin of a relative as they return to the huge Wadi al-Salam cemetery in the Shiite holy city of Najaf. Photo: AFP / Getty Images

But in September authorities announced that they would allow the dead to be transferred to the cemetery of their family’s choice.

Many of those buried came from other parts of the country.

“It was the first time he had been so far away,” Bahadur said of his 70-year-old father’s funeral. “I’m not sure it was done in the right religious way.”

Iraq is one of the most powerful countries in the Middle East, with more than 260,000 infections and nearly 6,000 deaths.

On September 4, the World Health Organization (WHO) said that “human remains are less likely to become infected when handled.”

Days later, after family pressure, Iraqi authorities announced that they would only allow the bodies to be transferred by “specialized health teams.”

The first return, however, proved chaotic. Hundreds of families in the “coronavirus cemetery” in the desert outside Najaf began searching for their family members late Thursday night and bringing the bodies home.

They brought their own shovels, baskets and new wooden coffins to remove the sand.

The sounds of mournful weeping and mourning prayers mingled in the clinkers of Picaxes across the sand.

An AFP correspondent says there are no medical professionals or cemetery guides on site to help families identify or properly exhume bodies.

In some cases, families dug into a cemetery marked with the name of a relative, simply to find an empty coffin or to retrieve the body of a young man while they were expecting to find the body of their elderly mother.

An Iraqi family exhumed a relative in a coronavirus cemetery outside the Shiite holy city of Najaf.

An Iraqi family exhumed a relative in a coronavirus cemetery outside the Shiite holy city of Najaf. Photo: AFP / Getty Images

Other corpses were not covered in burial shrouds, it is required by Islam as a token of respect.

The findings have sparked widespread criticism of the state-sponsored armed group in recent months, and some angry relatives have set fire to the group’s base nearby.

“Grave diggers don’t have the skills or the right equipment,” said Abdullah Karim, whose brother Ahmed died of complications from Kovid-19.

“They don’t know how to identify graves,” he said.

Karim, who is 230 kilometers (140 miles) south of Iraq’s Muthanna province, will not retrieve his brother for violating religious instructions.

In Islam a dead person should be buried as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours.

A Najaf scholar told AFP that there was no unreasonable law and order to keep the body intact, but that cremation was strictly forbidden and that returns were virtually unheard of.

“Since my father is buried here, I keep repeating his words in my head before I die: ‘My son, try to bury me in the family cemetery, don’t let me be too far away from my relatives,'” Hussein, another mourner who only Gave his first name, Dr.

The 53-year-old man took his father’s body to the huge Wadi al-Salam cemetery, where millions of Shia Muslims are buried.

Hussein said: “The dream that I have been hating for the last few months has come true.

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