Boris Johnson has provided Manchester with a few million pounds extra to move to Tier 3 lockdown

Boris Johnson offered a few million pounds of extra aid to Greater Manchester last night if the region agreed to comply with the toughest level of lockdown restrictions.

Adopting a ‘carrot and stick’ approach, the government yesterday publicly criticized Labor Mayor Andy Burnham for personally providing extra financial support.

Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove frustrated the mayor of Greater Manchester by saying that his ‘rank’ should be revived in a city that has one of the highest Covid-19 rates in the country.

A group of Manchester women sang as the curfew came at 10pm yesterday.  The city has one of the highest Covid-19 rates in the country

A group of Manchester women sang as the curfew came at 10pm yesterday. The city has one of the highest Covid-19 rates in the country

He told Sky News: ‘I want them to be separated for a moment for some political position and I want them to save our lives and protect the NHS so that they can work with us.

“What we need, instead of press conferences and postering, is to save lives.”

But a few hours later, Sir Edward Lister, a senior adviser to the prime minister, met with Mr Burnham, where he reportedly made significant new financial offers.

Whitehall sources said the cash could go up to “millions of pounds” to help ensure compliance with the Swiss Tier Three restrictions ministers want to introduce.

Using a ‘carrot and stick’ approach, the government yesterday publicly criticized Labor Mayor Andy Burnham (pictured) for personally providing extra financial support.

Using a ‘carrot and stick’ approach, the government yesterday publicly criticized Labor Mayor Andy Burnham (pictured) for personally providing extra financial support.

The offer is consistent with agreements with Marseilles and Lancashire, both of which have been granted an additional 30 30 million in business and job support in recent days.

But Mr. Burnham has no hesitation in demanding a full-fledged scheme to fully pay 60 per cent of the wages he is unable to do.

Its replacement, the Job Support Scheme, will provide only 66 per cent of wages, although ministers have insisted that low-paid people will also get universal credit top-ups.

Mr Burnham’s office described the talks with Sir Edward last night as ‘constructive’, with the mayor hoping they would consult with the locals overnight.

Downing Street indicated last week that Greater Manchester would be forced into Tier Three regardless today.

Boris Johnson offered a few million pounds in additional aid to Greater Manchester last night if the region agreed to comply with the toughest level of lockdown restrictions.

Boris Johnson offered millions of pounds in additional aid to Greater Manchester last night if the region agreed to comply with the toughest level of lockdown restrictions.

But it appeared last night that ministers were ready to take some more time to try to execute an agreement.

Mr Gove declined to comment yesterday when he was advised to stay in Greater Manchester Tier Three from today.

Ministers fear that Mr Burnham and other local leaders will cancel the crackdown, which will reduce compliance with the new rules, although Greater Manchester Police confirmed last night that officials would enforce any new rules, including a pub closure.

Mr Gove yesterday opposed Mr Burnham’s tough stance with leaders in Merseyside and Lancashire, who have reluctantly agreed to enter the three positions.

South Yorkshire is also thought to be close to agreeing to a package of Tier Three sanctions and assistance.

But attempts to politically isolate Mr Burnham have been thwarted by the support of local Conservative MPs who oppose further sanctions in the region.

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Backbench Tory MPs’ committee, said politicians across Greater Manchester were “quite united” against the plan.

He told the BBC’s Broadcasting House that local MPs and council leaders had “not been given proof of effectiveness”.

He added: “We do not see any reason for significant economic losses, especially if it does not bring full compensation for economic losses when it is proven that there is no evidence as to why this could be effective.”

Official data shows that the average seven-day rolling of the Carnavirus case in Greater Manchester has been declining in recent days.

Official data shows that the average seven-day rotation of carnavirus cases in Greater Manchester has been declining in recent days.

He warned the prime minister not to impose such restrictions: “If you find yourself in a situation where MPs, council leaders and mayors stand up for the people they represent, it would not be wise to impose them on their heads.” ‘

Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at Oxford University, also questioned the value of taking further action in Greater Manchester at this stage.

He wrote in The Sunday Telegraph that he said the average number of cases in the city had dropped by 20 percent in the first week of October, suggesting that measures could already be in place.

“If the policy continues to intervene at the first sight of a growing case, we will never learn whether any given intervention has worked,” he said. ‘It’s time to follow data, watch trends and slow down thinking.’

Mr Burnham acknowledged that the region was facing a “critical situation”, but the prime minister accused the region of being “exaggerated” by the severity of Covid-19 and said the intensive care unit was still at its peak in April.

Meanwhile, the latest daily figures reveal coronavirus-related cases in 16,982 more lab-confirmed cases in the UK. This brings the total number of cases to 722,409.

As of Sunday, another 67 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19, the government said. This took the UK to a total of 43,646.

Labor: We will repeatedly shut down the UK

Elderly individuals admitted yesterday that Labor’s plans for a temporary lockdown would see the economy and society shut down ‘multiple’ times this winter.

Sir Care Starmer last week called on Boris Johnson to immediately install a circuit breaker lasting two to three weeks.

But Kate Green, Labor’s shadow education secretary, acknowledged yesterday that the lockdown, which includes shops, pubs and restaurants, could take more than three weeks to take effect.

And Rachel Reeves, a minister in the shady cabinet office, said the exercise could have to be repeated several times in the next few months.

Asked if Labor had acknowledged the need to take the measure “more than once” during the winter and spring, Miss Reeves told the BBC’s Andrew Marr: “If it’s needed, that’s the way it should be, because we’ve caught the virus.” ‘

He added: ‘The tiered system is not working. Tier Two is a holding ground before you move to Tier Three. ‘

Cabinet Office Secretary Michael Gove said yesterday that he was “concerned” about Miss Reeves’ admission.

Asked if some form of national impediment was inevitable, he replied: ‘No.’

Mr Gove emphasized that it was “prudent” to take drastic measures instead of imposing national restrictions on blankets, which he said would hurt the economy by providing little health care.

Wales’ 17-day circuit break

Labor leaders could permanently put Wales in a complete lockdown for 17 days.

Welsh Prime Minister Mark Dreckford is expected to make an announcement today.

The circuit breaker will run from Friday evening from 6pm to the evening of November 6.

A leaked letter from the Welsh Confederation of Passenger Transport suggested that the green light had already been given.

It said the sanctions “would bring us back to the situation in March.” Primary schools will reopen at the end of the half-term but secondary will remain closed for lockdown.

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