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‘We won’t tear the police apart’, 99 percent are ‘great people’

President Trump said that after the protests over the killing of George Floyd, he was against the law enforcement agency in the White House against the act of eliminating the police and 99 percent of the officers believed that they were “great people”.

“We will not destroy the police. We will not disassemble our police and our police will not be disbanded. Our police allow us to live in peace, ”he said.

Many Democratic officers, including New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and the Republic of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, are supporting efforts to redirect police funds, and the majority of the Minneapolis city council promised to remove police departments this weekend.

“I only see it in some newspapers where they want to finish the police department – ‘finish the police department’ in Minneapolis, finish it. What does this mean ‘to finish’? Said Trump.

“We want to make sure there are no bad actors there, and sometimes you will see terrible things, as we have recently witnessed,” said Trump. “But I say 99, 99.9, but 99 percent are great people, and the record setting – the record setting – they’re doing business, so our crime statistics are still at the level they’re not yet available. “

Among the participants of the roundtable were the president of the International Police Chief Association, Steven Casstevens, and Pat Yoes, the national head of the Police Brotherhood Association.

Trump said, “We will go to work and talk about ideas, how we can do it better and how much more smoothly we can do it if possible. Such a thing should never have happened. “

Before the reporters left the room, he added: “We will not end our police force in a city. I think you may have some cities that want to try, but it would be very sad if people would not be protected. “

President Trump speaks to law enforcement officials at a roundtable.
President Trump speaks to law enforcement officials at a roundtable.AP Photography / Patrick Semansky

White House officials at the table greeted Trump in 2018 for signing the First Justice Act reform law, which shortened some prison sentences and reorganized various prison practices.

“You’ve been the chief of action,” said White House Chief of General Staff Mark Meadows.

Ja’Ron Smith, a prominent African-American White House official, talked about his own war around the police from time to time, but said, “I think it starts with law enforcement, like real reform that can change communities if we want real reform. “

“We can’t let some bad apples represent something that is the core of any community. That’s why we look forward to continuing to partner with all of you to find a solution. ”

Sheriff Tony Childress from Livingston County, Illinois, encouraged forced climbing training for officers and the ban on neck restraints.

“We are looking forward to working with you to include the law,” said Childress, in black.

Attorney General Bill Barr said he believes the police themselves want new standards that will greatly clarify proper use of force.

“Law enforcement agencies fully understand and understand the insecurity in the criminal justice system in the African-American community,” Barr said. “Since I have reflected this over the past few days and weeks, it has impressed me in most of our history, perhaps only 60 years ago, that the law was clearly discriminatory and did not provide equal protection. “

The White House meeting took place after Democrats in Capitol Hill opened a large police reform package Monday morning. The White House did not immediately respond to the bill, but Barr opposed a special offer to undo qualified immunity for officers accused of abuse of office.

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